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LIGHT VESSEL 5

Year: 2020
Materials: Hand-blown glass, water, wood
Size: 45 x 26 x 25 cm
Pedestal: 128 x 33 x 25 cm

Light Vessel 5 is one of my favorite pieces. I love how the piece feels as though it is still moving. There are no wrinkles in the piece. The movement is subtle. Feminine. Almost like a wave moving slowly across the ocean surface. I also love the base of the piece or the “foot” and the curve of the blown glass moving away from it. It exudes elegance and simplicity. I think this is why I love it so much. It is delicate yet powerful at the same time. The piece doesn’t scream in your face “Look at me!”. It doesn’t need to. It almost feels as if the piece knows how beautiful and graceful it is. It does not need external validation. Or someone to tell it what it already knows to be true. 



I made Light Vessel 5 in the summer of 2020. I was preparing for a show at DotDotDot in Stockholm where it was later shown. Tone Linghult and Jonas Ionnaou were my assistants. When making a piece this large it is important to have a team of skilled glassblowers to help you make the work as effortlessly as possible. As heavy as it is cold, it feels as though it is twice to three times the weight when it is on the blowpipe. This means you get tired. I get tired, and I need help taking the reheats or shielding from the heat of the glass, so I do not get a heat rash or burned. The intensity of making a blown glass object is exhilarating. There is no adrenaline rush like it. Well, maybe skydiving, but I wouldn’t know. I have not tried that yet. 


When making these pieces it is almost like having a conversation with the glass. I go into the process with an idea of the form and an approximate size of the “foot” or base I want to achieve, but the end result is almost always a surprise. In order to achieve the feeling of movement within each piece I “dance” with each one. And when I say “dance” I literally do this. Once I have blown the form, I get the glass as hot as possible without the form collapsing on itself. I then rip the piece out of the re-heating chamber and move with the material until it has an expression I find appealing, or it looks “done”. I can’t force the glass to be what I want it to be. It is a collaboration. Each piece is unique because they each have their own expression. Their own personality. Their own essence. And that is what makes this process so exciting. 

 
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Light effects made with Light Vessel 5.